Five Ways – Jun 23

June 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

First, during this month of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, I was delighted to see that the Apostleship of Prayer, inspired by the Jesuits following the ministry of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque and St. Claude de la Colombiere, added the ecumenical intention to the Morning Offering after Vatican II.  

The revised Morning Offering prayer now reads:  O Jesus, through the Immaculate Heart of Mary, I offer you my prayers, works, joys and sufferings of this day for all the intentions of your Sacred Heart in union with the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass throughout the world, for the salvation of souls, the reparation of sins, the reunion of all Christians, and in particular for the intentions of the Holy Father this month.  Amen.  

Note the joining of evangelization (the salvation of souls) and ecumenism (the reunion of all Christians). 

Secondly, I was a little skeptical to read in the April Reflection of the Gregorian University Foundation, p. 5, that Fr. Philipp Renczes, S.J., the dean of theology at the Greg, recently presented the newly launched program in “Comparative Theology of Christian Traditions and Ecumenical Studies,” as a response to “reading the signs of the times” and to the new “ecumenical spring” that has blossomed under the Francis pontificate. 

“We’re trying to figure out what the church will look like in 10 or 20 years, and ecumenical relations become more and more relevant to this.” 

Thirdly, the reflection below from the former Oblate General Councilor for Canada-US, Warren Brown, and the former Superior General, Louie Lougen, shows both the importance and difficulty of this. 

Many thanks to those who commented on the May 11 Five Ways E-letter. 

In Christ’s love, 

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I. 

Five Ways – May 23

May 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

Many thanks to those who commented on the April 17 Five Ways e-letter.

As we wind down the Easter Season, our first instinct might be to remember the Seven Joys of Mary. We remember perhaps too easily the Seven Sorrows. Are we equally familiar with the Seven Joys of Mary? And do we realize that the fruits of the Holy Spirit begin with love, joy and peace (Catechism, #736)? On the website Mission-Unity-Dialogue, the second page is Christian joy (www.harrywinter.org). In order to evangelize, we need to be joyful Christians.

Secondly, Sr. Nathalie Becquart, a French Xaviere Sister, undersecretary for the General Secretariate of the Synod of Bishops, gave speech at the Boston College of Theology and Ministry, Oct. 27, 2022, which was adapted in the journal America, April 2023. She wrote “A bishop from the United States recently told me the following: ‘This synod is changing my vision of evangelization. As a bishop, as a priest, I have been trained to teach, to preach, to tell the truth. Through all this experience of listening, I realize that the Spirit is already at work in all these people. This synod is really changing my vision of evangelization’.”

Sister Nathalie wrote especially about synod contributions regarding the role of women in the Church, and in the Boston College talk (not the America article) said regarding ecumenism and dialogue: “There was also a strong call to foster ecumenism. For the Church to face the most important problems of our world–ecological climate change, violence, polarization–we can’t do it alone, we have to do it with our brothers and sisters from the Christian faiths and other religions.”

Thirdly and finally, my thanks to Oblates Warren Brown and Peter Stoll for sending me the item below regarding the ecumenical dimension of the crowning of King Charles III. Anglicans in the rest of the world are called Episcopalians in the USA, and our two Churches are coming closer with events like King Charles’ Coronation.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

A 1st since 16th century: Cardinal Parolin represents Pope at coronation of Charles (aleteia.org)

The last time a Cardinal attended the coronation of a British King was in the 16th century. Two other high-ranking Catholics will also attend.


Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Pope’s secretary of state, will represent Pope Francis at the coronation of Charles III, King of the United Kingdom, on May 6, 2023, announced the director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni on May 4. This will be the first time since the 16th century that a Cardinal will attend the coronation of a British king in Westminster Abbey in London.
Pope Francis’ ‘number 2’ will not be the only high-ranking Catholic representative at the event. The Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Vincent Nichols, will also participate in the ceremony inside the cathedral. The Apostolic Nuncio to the United Kingdom, Archbishop Miguel Maury Buendia, is also invited.
Shortly after the formal coronation, performed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Anglican Church, Justin Welby, Cardinal Nichols is expected to bless the new King along with other Protestant and Orthodox leaders. The Cardinal will then say to the new leader: “May God pour upon you the riches of his grace, keep you in his holy fear, prepare you for a happy eternity, and receive you at the last into immortal glory.”
However, no Catholics were given any of the 50 positions of honor during the ceremony – unlike Jewish, Sikh and Hindu personalities who are expected to present the regalia, the objects representing royalty.

A defender of the faith
As supreme governor of the Church of England, Charles III will receive the title of “Fidei Defensor” – defender of the faith – which had been conferred on King Henry VIII by Pope Leo X in 1521. Twelve years later, in 1533, the divorce and remarriage of the King of England, without the consent of the Church, led to his excommunication by Pope Clement VII.
As a consequence, Henry VIII provoked a schism in 1534 by getting the English Parliament to recognize him as “the Supreme Head of the Church of England.” Relations with Rome were formally broken off in 1536, but re-established under the reign of Mary I (1553-1558). Her coronation on October 1, 1553, was the last ceremony performed by a Catholic Archbishop – Bishop Stephen Gardiner of Winchester. The last time a Cardinal was present was at the coronation of Mary I as Queen of Scots in 1542.
From then on, Catholics were considered enemies of the national community for several centuries and were barred from Anglican churches until the end of the 20th century. Another sign of anti-Catholicism: Until 1901, at the coronation of Edward VII, the new King had to publicly denounce transubstantiation. The practice was then abandoned.

At the last coronation, that of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, no Catholic entered the basilica. Archbishop William Godfrey, the Apostolic Nuncio at the time – the first since the Reformation – attended the procession to Westminster Abbey but did not enter. The then Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Bernard Griffin, did not attend but celebrated a mass for the Queen the day before the ceremony.

The reign of Elizabeth II helped to ease relations between Anglicans and Catholics, especially after the Second Vatican Council. However, diplomatic ties between the United Kingdom and the Holy See were not restored until 1982.

The Catholic origin of the anointing
One of the most important moments in the ceremony is the anointing, which is performed by the Archbishop of Canterbury while four knights prevent the audience from seeing the sacred ceremony. The head, chest, and hands of the King or Queen are anointed out of sight. The oil to be used on May 6 was consecrated by Orthodox Patriarch Theophilus III at the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem on March 4, 2023.
Historically, this anointing was granted by Pope Adrian I to one of the first kings of united England, Offa of Mercia, for his son Ecgfrith in 787. The practice then became customary in the 10th century.
Pope Francis offered two fragments of the Holy Cross to the new King, who asked that they be enshrined in the silver cross to be used during the coronation ceremony. The Holy See said this was an ecumenical gesture desired by the Pontiff.

Five Ways – April 23

April 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

First, many thanks to those who commented on the March 28th Five Ways Letter. I hope you all had a very Happy and Holy Easter.

Secondly, Massachusetts is one of the six states to celebrate Patriot’s Day, on the 3rd Monday of April, to commemorate the historic battles of Lexington and Concord, which mark the beginning of the American Revolution. It was during the revolution that the majority Protestant colonists discovered the value of the Irish Catholic American soldiers and the French Catholic navy, which were both essential to our separation from England.

And it was ten years ago that two Muslim brothers killed three people at the Boston Marathon (held each year since 1897 on Patriots Day) and maimed hundreds more. Cardinal O’Malley of Boston asked all of us pray for them yesterday, and for an end to the increasing violence in our country.

Thirdly, may you enjoy the attachment, the April newsletter of the US Catholic Mission Association. I found the final article, by Don McCrabb, the executive director, to be inspiring as he reflects on the hymn “Here I Am, Lord.”

To prolong Easter joy, google “The Joyful Noiseletter” and click on Holy Humor Sunday, to see how many churches celebrated special joy on the Sunday after Easter, yesterday.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

Five Ways Book/Fellowship


Monday, Sept. 25, 2023

Many thanks to those who responded to the August 28 Five Ways item.  In it I noted that September began with the Ecumenical aspect of the Season of Creation, on you tube.  The month of September also ends, Saturday, with The Ecumenical Vigil of Prayer, on the steps of St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome, to begin the October Synod.  You may google “Ecumenical Vigil of Prayer,” to see how young people especially will participate in it.  And the Vatican website (www.vatican.va/content/vatican/en) will tell you how to watch on you tube this important service which is scheduled for 5-7 pm Rome time, Sept. 30.

Below you will see an attack on the very concept of synodality, and my response to it (in both English and Spanish).  Please note that on the Mission-Unity-Dialogue website (www.harrywinter.org) the five earlier postings on synodality are now available on their own page, on the right of the home page.

 Your comments are most welcome.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

Synodality and the Oblates Part Six  Synodality and Oblates, Part Six, A Pandora’s Box? – OMIUSA

Spanish 1  Synodal y Pandora – OMIUSA

Spanish 2  Synodal Dos – OMIUSA


August 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

I hope you can open the YouTube below for this Friday, Sept. 1’s very important ecumenical observance of the Care of Creation Day begun by Pope Francis and immediately joined in by many religions, and by those of no religion.

And as we approach the October Synod on Synodality, there will be at least three Oblates among the 465 voting members.  Archbishop Liborius Ndumbukuti Nashenda, O.M.I. of Windhoek, Namibia; Archbishop Bejoy Nicephorus D’cruze, O.M.I. of Dhaka, Bangladesh, and Bishop Radoslaw Zimitrowicz, O.M.I., auxiliary bishop of Kamianets-Podilskyi, Ukraine. As more people are named in the supporting staff, there will probably be more from the Oblate Family.

For many of us, synodality is a mystery.  Recently, the pope’s apostolic nuncio in the USA, Cardinal Christophe Pierre, attempted to clear this up.  “I am a bit amazed to see people saying ‘We don’t want synodality, because this goes nowhere.’ It goes somewhere.  But it requires effort.  If you are a parish priest, you have to involve all your parishioners.  Fathers and mothers have to involve the family and work together” (Boston Pilot, July 21, 2023, p. 9).

One area that touches all of us is our attitude towards LGBTQ people.  The same issue of the Pilot newspaper notices this as part of the synod discussion (p. 5, from Our Sunday Visitor).

Many thanks to those who commented on the July 12 e-letter.  I welcome your insights especially on the Sept. 1 you tube presentation. Feel free to forward this e-letter to your friends.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

The #SeasonOfCreation 2023 begins on September 1 with the Day of Creation 🙌💙 Ecumenical faith leaders from around the world will lead this moment of presentation and reflection 🌊Join us: 🎉 
👉youtube.com/watch?v=pv3kEx…
#SeasonOfCreation2023 #prayer #catholics #commonhome pic.twitter.com/8yzfw6TxiS

July 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

July 12, 2023 Five Ways E-Letter

Many thanks to those who commented on the June 21 Five Ways E-Letter. 

Please note that Bishop Robert Barron below is one of those elected by the USA bishops to take part in the Synod on Synodality, which begins on Sept. 30 with an ecumenical service.  Twelve “fraternal delegates” from non-Catholic Christian Churches will also participate. A complete list, including the many women who will be able to participate for the first time in a synod, is available on the internet.

You may want to read the four synod items on the home page of the Mission-Unity-Dialogue website:  http://www.harrywinter.org.

The June 2023 issue of Oblate World, pp. 4-7, (available on www.omiusa.org) noted that our Oblate shrines in the USA are taking part in the National Eucharistic Revival, which began on the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, June 2022 and will run until Pentecost 2025.

And may we all slow down during the hot summer months and enjoy God’s many gifts to us, especially the presence of Jesus among us in the Most Blessed Sacrament, where He energizes us for evangelism, ecumenism and dialogue.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.


June 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

First, during this month of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, I was delighted to see that the Apostleship of Prayer, inspired by the Jesuits following the ministry of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque and St. Claude de la Colombiere, added the ecumenical intention to the Morning Offering after Vatican II.  

The revised Morning Offering prayer now reads:  O Jesus, through the Immaculate Heart of Mary, I offer you my prayers, works, joys and sufferings of this day for all the intentions of your Sacred Heart in union with the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass throughout the world, for the salvation of souls, the reparation of sins, the reunion of all Christians, and in particular for the intentions of the Holy Father this month.  Amen.  

Note the joining of evangelization (the salvation of souls) and ecumenism (the reunion of all Christians). 

Secondly, I was a little skeptical to read in the April Reflection of the Gregorian University Foundation, p. 5, that Fr. Philipp Renczes, S.J., the dean of theology at the Greg, recently presented the newly launched program in “Comparative Theology of Christian Traditions and Ecumenical Studies,” as a response to “reading the signs of the times” and to the new “ecumenical spring” that has blossomed under the Francis pontificate. 

“We’re trying to figure out what the church will look like in 10 or 20 years, and ecumenical relations become more and more relevant to this.” 

Thirdly, the reflection below from the former Oblate General Councilor for Canada-US, Warren Brown, and the former Superior General, Louie Lougen, shows both the importance and difficulty of this. 

Many thanks to those who commented on the May 11 Five Ways E-letter. 

In Christ’s love, 

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I. 


May 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

Many thanks to those who commented on the April 17 Five Ways e-letter.

As we wind down the Easter Season, our first instinct might be to remember the Seven Joys of Mary. We remember perhaps too easily the Seven Sorrows. Are we equally familiar with the Seven Joys of Mary? And do we realize that the fruits of the Holy Spirit begin with love, joy and peace (Catechism, #736)? On the website Mission-Unity-Dialogue, the second page is Christian joy (www.harrywinter.org). In order to evangelize, we need to be joyful Christians.

Secondly, Sr. Nathalie Becquart, a French Xaviere Sister, undersecretary for the General Secretariate of the Synod of Bishops, gave speech at the Boston College of Theology and Ministry, Oct. 27, 2022, which was adapted in the journal America, April 2023. She wrote “A bishop from the United States recently told me the following: ‘This synod is changing my vision of evangelization. As a bishop, as a priest, I have been trained to teach, to preach, to tell the truth. Through all this experience of listening, I realize that the Spirit is already at work in all these people. This synod is really changing my vision of evangelization’.”

Sister Nathalie wrote especially about synod contributions regarding the role of women in the Church, and in the Boston College talk (not the America article) said regarding ecumenism and dialogue: “There was also a strong call to foster ecumenism. For the Church to face the most important problems of our world–ecological climate change, violence, polarization–we can’t do it alone, we have to do it with our brothers and sisters from the Christian faiths and other religions.”

Thirdly and finally, my thanks to Oblates Warren Brown and Peter Stoll for sending me the item below regarding the ecumenical dimension of the crowning of King Charles III. Anglicans in the rest of the world are called Episcopalians in the USA, and our two Churches are coming closer with events like King Charles’ Coronation.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

A 1st since 16th century: Cardinal Parolin represents Pope at coronation of Charles (aleteia.org)

The last time a Cardinal attended the coronation of a British King was in the 16th century. Two other high-ranking Catholics will also attend.


Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Pope’s secretary of state, will represent Pope Francis at the coronation of Charles III, King of the United Kingdom, on May 6, 2023, announced the director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni on May 4. This will be the first time since the 16th century that a Cardinal will attend the coronation of a British king in Westminster Abbey in London.
Pope Francis’ ‘number 2’ will not be the only high-ranking Catholic representative at the event. The Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Vincent Nichols, will also participate in the ceremony inside the cathedral. The Apostolic Nuncio to the United Kingdom, Archbishop Miguel Maury Buendia, is also invited.
Shortly after the formal coronation, performed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Anglican Church, Justin Welby, Cardinal Nichols is expected to bless the new King along with other Protestant and Orthodox leaders. The Cardinal will then say to the new leader: “May God pour upon you the riches of his grace, keep you in his holy fear, prepare you for a happy eternity, and receive you at the last into immortal glory.”
However, no Catholics were given any of the 50 positions of honor during the ceremony – unlike Jewish, Sikh and Hindu personalities who are expected to present the regalia, the objects representing royalty.

A defender of the faith
As supreme governor of the Church of England, Charles III will receive the title of “Fidei Defensor” – defender of the faith – which had been conferred on King Henry VIII by Pope Leo X in 1521. Twelve years later, in 1533, the divorce and remarriage of the King of England, without the consent of the Church, led to his excommunication by Pope Clement VII.
As a consequence, Henry VIII provoked a schism in 1534 by getting the English Parliament to recognize him as “the Supreme Head of the Church of England.” Relations with Rome were formally broken off in 1536, but re-established under the reign of Mary I (1553-1558). Her coronation on October 1, 1553, was the last ceremony performed by a Catholic Archbishop – Bishop Stephen Gardiner of Winchester. The last time a Cardinal was present was at the coronation of Mary I as Queen of Scots in 1542.
From then on, Catholics were considered enemies of the national community for several centuries and were barred from Anglican churches until the end of the 20th century. Another sign of anti-Catholicism: Until 1901, at the coronation of Edward VII, the new King had to publicly denounce transubstantiation. The practice was then abandoned.

At the last coronation, that of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953, no Catholic entered the basilica. Archbishop William Godfrey, the Apostolic Nuncio at the time – the first since the Reformation – attended the procession to Westminster Abbey but did not enter. The then Archbishop of Westminster, Cardinal Bernard Griffin, did not attend but celebrated a mass for the Queen the day before the ceremony.

The reign of Elizabeth II helped to ease relations between Anglicans and Catholics, especially after the Second Vatican Council. However, diplomatic ties between the United Kingdom and the Holy See were not restored until 1982.

The Catholic origin of the anointing
One of the most important moments in the ceremony is the anointing, which is performed by the Archbishop of Canterbury while four knights prevent the audience from seeing the sacred ceremony. The head, chest, and hands of the King or Queen are anointed out of sight. The oil to be used on May 6 was consecrated by Orthodox Patriarch Theophilus III at the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem on March 4, 2023.
Historically, this anointing was granted by Pope Adrian I to one of the first kings of united England, Offa of Mercia, for his son Ecgfrith in 787. The practice then became customary in the 10th century.
Pope Francis offered two fragments of the Holy Cross to the new King, who asked that they be enshrined in the silver cross to be used during the coronation ceremony. The Holy See said this was an ecumenical gesture desired by the Pontiff.


April Five Ways E-Letter
April 17, 2023

First, many thanks to those who commented on the March 28th Five Ways Letter. I hope you all had a very Happy and Holy Easter.

Secondly, Massachusetts is one of the six states to celebrate Patriot’s Day, on the 3rd Monday of April, to commemorate the historic battles of Lexington and Concord, which mark the beginning of the American Revolution. It was during the revolution that the majority Protestant colonists discovered the value of the Irish Catholic American soldiers and the French Catholic navy, which were both essential to our separation from England.

And it was ten years ago that two Muslim brothers killed three people at the Boston Marathon (held each year since 1897 on Patriots Day) and maimed hundreds more. Cardinal O’Malley of Boston asked all of us pray for them yesterday, and for an end to the increasing violence in our country.

Thirdly, may you enjoy the attachment, the April newsletter of the US Catholic Mission Association. I found the final article, by Don McCrabb, the executive director, to be inspiring as he reflects on the hymn “Here I Am, Lord.”

To prolong Easter joy, google “The Joyful Noiseletter” and click on Holy Humor Sunday, to see how many churches celebrated special joy on the Sunday after Easter, yesterday.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.


A Support Group for Any Christian

March Five Ways E-Letter
March 29, 2023

First, my thanks to Artie Pingolt, president of Oblate Partners, for sending me the important attachment.  It shows how crucial Christian Unity and Interreligious Dialogue are to confront serious challenges, such as the invasion of the Ukraine by Russia. Such cooperation is needed at the local level too.

Secondly, as we approach the Triduum of Holy Thursday evening through Easter Sunday, you might want to consider the custom of Eastern Christians on Easter Sunday afternoon.  They gather in cemeteries to process to the graves of those who have died since last Easter.  When they reach each grave, the priest shouts out “Christ is risen,” and the people respond “He is truly risen.”

Let us encourage all our friends and relatives who have dropped out of our Churches, to come with us on Easter and the Sundays after.

Thirdly, the website of Jesuit journal America posted an article on March 7 by theologian Jon Nilson, headlined “The Synod is missing something essential: other churches.”  He is very concerned that the USA report “National Synthesis of the People of God in the United States of America for the Diocesan Phase of the 2021-2023 Synod” was crafted from 290 documents distilled from 22,000 reports from parishes, dioceses, etc.

But the importance of working with other Christian Churches is never mentioned in the synthesis.  Nilson does not report that the Eastern Churches in the USA did submit their own document. However, especially Episcopalian and Presbyterian Churches have a long record of involving the laity in every major decision and development. A major feature of synodality is to decrease clericalism and increase the role of lay people. Nilson’s concern that ecumenism did not make it into the USA synthesis needs further attention by our bishops.

If any of the Five Ways recipients can find the report on synodality from the Eastern Churches USA, please send it to me.

In the meantime, many thanks to all who commented on the Feb. 14 Five Ways e-letter.  May we each have an inspiring Holy Week and Easter!

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.


People who have read the book Dividing or Strengthening, or who have made the retreat (both available, click here) have expressed a desire to pray for unity and to work with other Christians. We meet regularly and update. There are no dues and no regulations. We are a very small part of an increasing web of Christians who identify with one denomination and are concerned with all Christians. Some of the larger groups are Renovare, Stephan Ministries, Taize, and Iona.

Father Tom Ryan, CSP, in his 2015 book Christian Unity: How You Can Make a Difference, describes at length (ch. 5, pp. 83-107) the surge in the number of lay groups focusing on Evangelization and Christian Unity (Paulist Press). But he also states that apathy toward Christian Unity is growing (p. 121).


Currently we have about 50 people connected by e-mail and regular meetings. An initial group came out of the weekend retreat at King’s House, Buffalo, MN, Jan. 15-17, 2010. Following that, there were parish retreats at St. Casimir’s Church, St. Paul, MN, March, 2010 and St. Patrick’s Church, St. Paul, MN, March, 2012. What started out as an update meeting for those who attended any of the three previous retreats was expanded to anyone who is interested in the challenge of sharing our faith: June 6,7, 2012 (evening, repeated the following morning for those unable to come in the evening), and Nov. 7, 8, 2012; May15,16, 2013, May 7th, 8th 2014 See Below


Mass on the Moon

Sixth Sunday after Pentecost (2019)

Fifty years ago yesterday, on July 20, 1969, Presbyterian Ruling Elder Buzz Aldrin celebrated the Lord’s Supper on the moon. The first food and drink consumed on the moon was the blessed bread and wine from Aldrin’s church, Webster Presbyterian, near Houston, TX.

Communion on the Moon Fifty Years Later (2019)

When President Donald Trump gave his State of the Union Message on Feb. 5, 2019, he reminded us that fifty years ago this July 20, humans first walked on the moon. By placing astronaut Buzz Aldrin, among those notables invited, he also reminded us that the first food and drink consumed on the moon was the Blessed Bread and Wine Aldrin had brought from his church, Webster Presbyterian, near Houston, TX.


May the rest of your day be filled with love and happiness

February, 2023
January, 2023

2022

December, 2022
November 2022

September 24, 2022

August 17, 2022
July 14, 2022
June 15, 2022

May 17, 2022
April 13, 2022
March 20, 2022
February 19, 2022
January 11, 2022

2021
December 14, 2021
November 19, 2021
October 11, 2021
September 24, 2021
September 9, 2021

Click Here for earlier Five Ways Items

Five Ways – March 23

March 29, 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

March 29, 2023

First, my thanks to Artie Pingolt, president of Oblate Partners, for sending me the important attachment.  It shows how crucial Christian Unity and Interreligious Dialogue are to confront serious challenges, such as the invasion of the Ukraine by Russia. Such cooperation is needed at the local level too.

Secondly, as we approach the Triduum of Holy Thursday evening through Easter Sunday, you might want to consider the custom of Eastern Christians on Easter Sunday afternoon.  They gather in cemeteries to process to the graves of those who have died since last Easter.  When they reach each grave, the priest shouts out “Christ is risen,” and the people respond “He is truly risen.”

Let us encourage all our friends and relatives who have dropped out of our Churches, to come with us on Easter and the Sundays after.

Thirdly, the website of Jesuit journal America posted an article on March 7 by theologian Jon Nilson, headlined “The Synod is missing something essential: other churches.”  He is very concerned that the USA report “National Synthesis of the People of God in the United States of America for the Diocesan Phase of the 2021-2023 Synod” was crafted from 290 documents distilled from 22,000 reports from parishes, dioceses, etc.

But the importance of working with other Christian Churches is never mentioned in the synthesis.  Nilson does not report that the Eastern Churches in the USA did submit their own document. However, especially Episcopalian and Presbyterian Churches have a long record of involving the laity in every major decision and development. A major feature of synodality is to decrease clericalism and increase the role of lay people. Nilson’s concern that ecumenism did not make it into the USA synthesis needs further attention by our bishops.

If any of the Five Ways recipients can find the report on synodality from the Eastern Churches USA, please send it to me.

In the meantime, many thanks to all who commented on the Feb. 14 Five Ways e-letter.  May we each have an inspiring Holy Week and Easter!

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.


People who have read the book Dividing or Strengthening, or who have made the retreat (both available, click here) have expressed a desire to pray for unity and to work with other Christians. We meet regularly and update. There are no dues and no regulations. We are a very small part of an increasing web of Christians who identify with one denomination and are concerned with all Christians. Some of the larger groups are Renovare, Stephan Ministries, Taize, and Iona.

Father Tom Ryan, CSP, in his 2015 book Christian Unity: How You Can Make a Difference, describes at length (ch. 5, pp. 83-107) the surge in the number of lay groups focusing on Evangelization and Christian Unity (Paulist Press). But he also states that apathy toward Christian Unity is growing (p. 121).


Currently we have about 50 people connected by e-mail and regular meetings. An initial group came out of the weekend retreat at King’s House, Buffalo, MN, Jan. 15-17, 2010. Following that, there were parish retreats at St. Casimir’s Church, St. Paul, MN, March, 2010 and St. Patrick’s Church, St. Paul, MN, March, 2012. What started out as an update meeting for those who attended any of the three previous retreats was expanded to anyone who is interested in the challenge of sharing our faith: June 6,7, 2012 (evening, repeated the following morning for those unable to come in the evening), and Nov. 7, 8, 2012; May15,16, 2013, May 7th, 8th 2014 See Below


Mass on the Moon

Sixth Sunday after Pentecost (2019)

Fifty years ago yesterday, on July 20, 1969, Presbyterian Ruling Elder Buzz Aldrin celebrated the Lord’s Supper on the moon. The first food and drink consumed on the moon was the blessed bread and wine from Aldrin’s church, Webster Presbyterian, near Houston, TX.

Communion on the Moon Fifty Years Later (2019)

When President Donald Trump gave his State of the Union Message on Feb. 5, 2019, he reminded us that fifty years ago this July 20, humans first walked on the moon. By placing astronaut Buzz Aldrin, among those notables invited, he also reminded us that the first food and drink consumed on the moon was the Blessed Bread and Wine Aldrin had brought from his church, Webster Presbyterian, near Houston, TX.


May the rest of your day be filled with love and happiness

Five Ways – Feb 23

February 14, 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

First, Pope Francis visit to South Sudan, Africa, Feb. 4-5, was extraordinary. At the
request of the South Sudanese government, he was accompanied by the Archbishop
of Canterbury Justin Welby (Anglican, Episcopalian in USA) and the Moderator of the
Church of Scotland, Rt. Rev. Iain Greenshields (Presbyterian/Reformed).


The secular media noted that this is the first time ever that the three leaders of different
Christian Churches went together. And they noted that it was not the idea of those
Churches, but of the government of the nation visited. A government official realized
that 60% of the population of South Sudan belongs to these three Churches.


How can each of us promote such efforts at Mission and Unity in the future?


Secondly, our Five Ways member Dr. Bob Brenneman, from Minnesota, a great
university teacher and promoter of Christian-Muslim relations, has a daughter-in-law
from Antioch, Syria, whose family there lost their homes in the recent earthquake
affecting Turkey and Syria. Bob informed me that those families are simply grateful
they are alive. This weekend, many Christian Churches in the USA are taking up
special collections to help the people of Turkey and Syria rebuild their homes, and bury
their dead. Let us be generous. (Bob’s photo and his presentation as an early speaker
with the Five Ways Fellowship is available on www.omiusa.org, April 20, 2015).


Finally, the US Catholic Mission Association’s offer to present an interactive webinar
for each Sunday’s Scripture readings begins this Thursday: see below. I hope this
social media innovation will help us see that our Sunday worship involves Mission,
Unity and Dialogue. Oblates have been very supportive of USCMA from the beginning,
especially with Anatole (Benny) Baillargeon helping to create it, Greg Gallagher serving
as a president, 2013-16, and current general councilor for Canada-US Jim Brobst,
during his time as USA vicar-provincial for mission (see www.omiusa.org).


Many thanks to those who commented on the January 10 e-letter.


In Christ’s love,
Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I

Five Ways – Jan 23

January 10, 2023 Five Ways Newsletter

First, as we prepare to observe the 115th annual Week of
Prayer for Christian Unity, from Jan. 18-25, please make sure
that your parish has the materials prepared by a joint
committee from the Vatican and the World Council of
Churches. These may be obtained on the website of the
Graymoor Ecumenical and Interreligious
Institute: www.geii.org. Also included are homily notes for
the celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day on January 16.

Secondly, I recommend a marvelous book on St. Teresa of
Calcutta, by her lawyer Jim Towey, To Love and Be Loved, A
Personal Portrait of Mother Teresa. Several things struck me
forcibly: she absorbed evangelism, ecumenism and respect
for other religions, especially Hinduism. She and her
Missionaries of Charity walk the very thin line between
witnessing to Jesus and honoring the good in other
religions. She also rejected abortion but worked with
abortion promoter Hilary Clinton to found a center in
Washington, DC, for abandoned babies.

Finally, when we observed the feast of St. Peter Canisius, on
Dec. 21, his statement in Wikipedia offers us great advice on
dealing with opponents. “If you treat them right, the Germans
will give you everything. Many err in matters of faith, but
without arrogance. They err in the German way, mostly
honest, a bit simple-minded, but very open for everything
Lutheran. An honest explanation of the faith would be much
more effective than a polemical attack against reformers.

The Wiki author notes “He rejected attacks against John
Calvin and Melanchthon: ‘With words like these, we don’t
cure patients, we make them incurable’.”

The Vatican II Decree on Ecumenism insists that we search
together with Eastern Orthodox and Protestants for the
talents which each Christian Church embodies. We offer
what we have that is missing in them, and we accept from
them what they have that we need. All this for the sake of
better evangelizing non-Christians and strengthening
Christians.

Many thanks to those who commented on the Dec. 11 Five
Ways e-letter.

In Christ’s love,

Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I.

Current

Synodality and Oblates in the USA

Pope Francis is asking every parish, retreat center, house of formation, and Catholic center to discuss  synodality. In the seven mandated questions, the fourth asks “How connected do you feel to the core mission of the Church–making disciples for Jesus?” St. Eugene de Mazenod must be agreeing with this on every Catholic being a missionary.

In our first installment, we mentioned how much St. Eugene lived synodality, even though he may not have used the word (Synodality and the Oblates: Part 1).
Since the core of synodality is mission, St. Eugene looks over our shoulders as we invest in synodality. (Click here Part Two)  

In October, the Diocese entered into the process of discernment regarding ministry. The entire diocese was given 75 questions for parishioners to respond to.  So we sent them out and had an above average number of folks fill it out. We also come out as environmentally green and are in the upper 80% in that category in the city and diocese.  (Click here Part Three)

The Synodality  report submitted by Fr. Jim Allen, regarding our Belleville Oblates, and the Synodality report submitted by Fr. Harry Winter, regarding the Diocese of Syracuse, may seem unrelated.  But we are putting them together to show the widespread interest in the Synodality process going on in every religious community and every diocese in the world.  Click here Part Four

Two experts recently differed on the role of ecumenism in the process of synodality. I have also inserted the importance of ecumenism as the Oblate Constitutions describe it.  (Click here for Part Five)


Oblate Missiologists includes at least one Oblate Missiologist from each of our five geographical regions.

First produced as a hard copy in 1997, it is now made available in two versions on the internet.   For a PDF version, click here. The type is smaller and you cannot edit it.


For Ecumenism and Laity in the Oct. 2021-OCt. 2023 Synod.

Thank you for being here for the opening of the Synod. you have come by many different roads and from different Churches, each bearing your own questions and hopes. I am certain the Spirit will guide us and give us the grace to move forward together, to listen to one another and to embark on a discernment of the times in which we are living, in solidarity with the struggles and aspirations of all humanity. I wan to say again that eh Synod is not a parliament or an opinion poll; the Synod is an ecclesial event and its protagonist is the Holy Spirit. If the Spirit is not present, there will be no Synod. Click Here to Read More


Political Order and the Ethics of Peace (August 15 – September 16, 2022)

The global political order is today confronted with one of its most serious and dangerous crises since 1945. The violation of ionternational norms and the massive scale of suffering and destruction have prompted vigorous and unprecedented forms of cooperation aimed at attaining a peaceful resolution. Click here to Read More


Lutheran and Catholic Churches in Sweden Increase Praying Together

Bishop Johan Tyrberg, Diocese of lund SwedenIn this Voices from the Communion interview, Bishop Johan Tyrberg, Diocese of Lund, Church of Sweden, looks back at how a historic ecumenical event that put his home city on the global map five years ago continues to change Lutheran-Catholic relations there. He also reflects on his early education, his interest in natural sciences and acting, and finding his way into theological formation, and eventually the pastoral ministry. Click Here to Read More


Synodality and Oblates in the USA, Part Four


Posted on August 24, 2022

The Synodality report submitted by Fr. Jim Allen, regarding our Belleville Oblates, and the Synodality report submitted by Fr. Harry Winter, regarding the Diocese of Syracuse, may seem unrelated.  But we are putting them together to show the widespread interest in the Synodality process going on in every religious community and every diocese in the world.

Diocese of Syracuse Report

When I was assisting the ill pastor in my home parish of St. Paul, Norwich, NY, from July 25-Aug. 7, 2022, the diocese published in its newspaper The Catholic Sun, a summary of 42 listening sessions. What caught my attention was the addition of “special listening sessions,” three of which  were “for those who for whatever reason are estranged from the Church, with a particular focus on the LGBTQ Community.” Later in the report, when the top 10 themes were listed, “The LGBTQ Community” was #6. And when this was described, the authors explained “At one of our special listening sessions geared to the LGBTQ Community, several gay people spoke of their experience of being considered ‘possessed’ or ‘mentally ill.’ Their stories were heartbreaking.”

In a meeting with one of my high school classmates, the husband and wife both expressed their concern and bewilderment over a lesbian daughter and daughter-in-law.  This development already presented in “Synodality and  Oblates in the USA, Part Three,” continues to grow.

The report also described “one of the surprises was how quickly and how deeply the people entered into the sacred silence.  For the most part, the people listened carefully and attentively to one another, and seemed to act just as the Holy Father wished:  they spoke freely, boldly , and courageously …and respectfully (with a few exceptions).”

For the entire Syracuse Diocese report, dated July 6, 2022, but not made available until July 24, click here to see it as published by The Catholic Sun.

The Contribution of a Community of Religious Men Toward the Synod

St. Henry’s Oblate ResidenceBelleville, IL

On May 26, 2022, 13 of the 18 Missionary Oblates living in this community gathered prayerfully to express their thoughts on the preparatory questions for the Synod of 2023. The questions were adapted to the nature of this community of priests and Brothers , most of whom are retired or in Reduced Active Ministry.

  1. How is “journeying together” happening in this community?

The experience of community life has been a unique experience for each person, depending partially on their ministerial assignments: some have been in small communities; some, in large; some were basically alone for several years.

However, there is general agreement that community life here is a positive source of sharing and mutual support. Given the rather advanced age of most of the members, it has been described as “living while dying, making the best of our time together, aware of our mortality.”

Our shared identity as Oblates of Mary Immaculate affords us the opportunity to learn from one another as we move forward together. The Holy Spirit works differently in each of us and helps us to understand our differences and our gifts.

  • What is there about Jesus that draws me to him? What is there about Jesus that makes an impression on me?
  • Over the years the relationship with Jesus has changed and become more real in various ways.
  • Jesus teaches us by his own life to be more giving than receiving.
  • We can look at the concrete actions of Jesus as examples of how we can touch the lives of others.
  • We also can find images of Jesus in persons who have affected our lives (e.g. a parent or a teacher)
  • Jesus wants to be a constant presence in our lives; one who lives within us.
  • What is there about the Church that draws me closer to the Lord and to other people?

As “cradle Catholics,” it is difficult to imagine a life totally outside of the Church. But the idea and experience of Church has expanded through contact with different peoples and cultures. At the same time, we would find it difficult to experience God without being in contact with other people.

Most of us knew the Church before we even really knew God and Jesus. It was only through maturing in our faith that we began to realize the transcendence of God and the call to be of service to others.

At this point in our lives, given the experiences we have had in many places and with so many people, the Church is anything but an abstraction. We see the Church in the persons we serve, whether they are prospering or struggling.

  •  What are my hopes for the Church that will help to draw me closer to Christ?
  • To see a Church with living saints who live their Catholic faith in such a way that we too can be proud to be Catholic.
  • To see a Church that is willing to look at its way of presenting its moral teaching in a way that attracts and encourages people to walk the path that is sometimes hard. This should include an in depth and fresh look at the relationship between what is considered to be the “natural law” norm and the “lived experience” of people who are also living what they consider to be “natural.” So many people see some aspects of the Church’s moral teaching so stringent and demanding that they either give up or become pathologically scrupulous.
  • Some issues in the Church are not going to go away and they need to be discussed openly and without bias and preconceived answers. Among them stand out such areas as the role of the laity and especially women in the Church; obligatory celibacy of the priests of the Latin Rite; inclusivity, even of sinners (and that’s all of us).
  • How will the Church be present to the world in the face of climate change and a possible collapse of the environment?
  • How can the Church make synodality a normal way of being Church so that this current process not be mere tokenism? Are we going to take the faithful seriously in their own baptized role as “priests, prophets and kings”?
  • We need to meet people where they are and as they are.

Archive

For Ecumenism and Laity in the Oct. 2021 – Oct. 2023 Synod

Thank you for being here for the opening of the Synod. you have come by many different roads and from different Churches, each bearing your own questions and hopes. I am certain the Spirit will guide us and give us the grace to move forward together, to listen to one another and to embark on a discernment of the times in which we are living, in solidarity with the struggles and aspirations of all humanity. I wan to say again that eh Synod is not a parliament or an opinion poll; the Synod is an ecclesial event and its protagonist is the Holy Spirit. If the Spirit is not present, there will be no Synod. Click Here to Read More


Pioneer Catholic Feminist, (available on Amazon books)

Do you know who is in your own Clod of Witnesses (heb 12:1), the people in your life who have died but still influence you positively in a significant way? Fr. Harry Winter, O.M.I., Ph.D. traces the history of Virginia’s Governor John Floyd Jr. (1783-1837) and his pioneer feminist wife, Letitia Preston Floyd, *1779-1852) and their descendants to show how their influence is as important for the United States today as President John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams and their decendants. Click Here to learn more


Superior General Describes Oblate Role in the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples

The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate continue to play a significant role in many of the most difficult missions around the world. We are well known and highly regarded in the Church for our availability. although with good humor, we like to joke that we are specialists in making missions difficult, the simple truth is that Oblates are laboring with great zeal in many of the most challenging areas of the globe. Click Here to learn more


For the Muslim Response to Pope Francis’ Visit (March 2021)

Pope Francis’s recent trip to Iraq will undoubtably have a lasting impact on the country in ways that only time will tell, however, in the immediate aftermath, a few significant developments can already be seen. Click Here to learn more


“Ecumenical Vademecum” Statement Animating Christian Unity (December 3, 2020)

The ministry entrusted to the bishop is a service of unity both within his diocese and of unity between the local church and the universal church. That ministry therefore has special significance in the search for the unity of all Christ’s followers. The bishop’s responsibility for promoting Christian unity is clearly affirmed in the Code of Canon Law of the Latin Church among the tasks of his
pastoral office: “He is to act with humanity and charity toward the brothers and sisters who are not in full communion with the Catholic Church and is to foster ecumenism as it is understood by the Church” (Can 383 §3CIC 1983). Click Here to learn more


Oblate Missiologists includes at least one Oblate missiologist from each of our five geographical regions. First produced as a hard copy in 1997, it is now made available in two versions on the internet.   For a PDF version, click here. The type is smaller and you cannot edit it.


Vatican and World Council of Churches publish dynamite document on COVID

Serving a Wounded World in Interreligious Solidarity.
A Christian Call to reflection and Action During COVID-19 and Beyond Click Here to learn more


Commentary on Dynamite Document and Season of Creation

Commentary on the Statement “Christian Witness in a Multi-Religious World” by Harry E. Winter, OMI. Printed in Ecumenical Trends 46 (Oct. 2017, 9):10-11.
Insight by Fernando Velazquez, OMI, May 15, 2017: part of the neglect of this statement comes from the earlier document “Dominus Iesus” (2000). Mission exists in a difficult and creative tension with Unity/Dialogue. Click Here to learn more


Two Oblate Ecumenists on the Road to Glory

Fr. Waclaw Hrniewicz, OMIFather Waclaw Hryniewicz, O.M.I., an expert on the Eastern Orthodox Church, died on May 26 at age 83 in Poland. Fr. Jean Gueguen, O.M.I., a promoter of the Taize Community, died on May 24 at age 95 in France.

On March 20, 1995, Hryniewicz was the featured speaker at Oblate College, Washington DC, to open the Oblate Center for Mission Studies. Due to his friendship with Fr. George McLean, O.M.I., Hryniewicz had agreed to speak about developments between the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Click Here to learn more


“Understanding the signs of Our Times”

Fr. George McLeanAn interesting article from: McLean Center Online Seminars
The current pandemic felt by the entire globe has brought not only deep anxieties and fears but also profound quests and search for root causes and answers for our challenging situations socio
political, cultural, ecological, etc. In order to understand the uniqueness and specificity of our times and to look for some resources that may help us deepen our understanding, this special research project intends to explore the philosophicaltheological writings of a special figure, Romano Guardini, one of most important intellectuals of the Catholic tradition in the 20th century. Click Here to learn more


New Biography on Fr. George McLean has been released!

If you wish to purchase a physical copy, give Matthew Martin a call 210-340-1366 ext 205 or email him at mmartin@ost.edu and he can sell you one for $17.50 plus $5.00 shipping and handling for a total of $22.50. We take VISA, MasterCard, American Express and Discover. an electronic version is available. Click Here to learn more (link is to large to upload)

Mclean Center Activities — Click Here

Fr. George McLean, OMI — Full Bio — Click Here


Oblate Missiologist, Tragic and Talented (2018)

His Irish parents and he endured the persecution of the English during his youth in Ireland and England. So when Con Scollen worked with the Native Americans in Canada and the United States, he bluntly told them any treaty from the national governments wasn’t worth the paper it was written on. An Oblate for 26 years, and a diocesan priest for the 17 remaining years of his life, he surpassed his teacher, Father Albert Lacombe, OMI, for his knowledge of Native American languages and culture. He is revered by them today. Click Here to learn more


Native Peoples indigenous art at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art (2019)

Thanks to Fr. Seamus Finn, OMI for this related piece. Click here to watch video


High Point of Bibliographia Missionaria (Dec. 6, 2017)

Thank you for being here for this important moment in the history of the University and our library. We present a volume, 70° c, a unique magazine, Bibliographia Missionaria. Begun in 1935 by Prof. Johannes Baptista Rommerskirchen, OMI, today presents itself as a significant contribution to reflection and research on all things related to the Church’s mission. Click Here to learn more


Witnessing to Jesus, and Ecumenism at Royal Wedding (May 19, 2018)

African-American Episcopalian Bishop Michael Curry’s sermon at the royal wedding is a marvelous combination of witnessing to Jesus, and Christian Unity. His quoting Jesuit theologian Teilhard de Chardin is unprecedented in such a world-wide event. However, he also is an example of the difficulty within the Anglican Communion, where many find his espousal of same sex marriage and other moral matters to be divisive. Click here to learn more


Grieving for an Oblate Accomplishment (2018)

For many years, Oblates were accustomed to seeing an annual photo of an Oblate missiologist presenting to the pope a comprehensive bibliography listing every book or article written the previous year on Mission, Ecumenism, Dialogue, Sociology of Religion, etc. Known as Bibliographia Missionaria, this book was of immense aid to anyone interested in a topic concerning the spread of the Christian faith. Click Here to learn more


Episcopalian/Anglicans Join Lutherans and Catholics in Reformation Document (2017)

On 31st of October 2017, the final day of the year of the common ecumenical Commemoration of the Reformation, we are very thankful for the spiritual and theological gifts received through the Reformation, a commemoration that we have shared together and with our ecumenical partners globally. Likewise, we begged forgiveness for our failures and for the ways in which Christians have wounded the Body of the Lord and offended each other during the five hundred years since the beginning of the Reformation until today. Click here to learn more


Four Articles on Oblates and the 50th Anniversary of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal (2017)

December 19, 2017 – Father John Morin, OMI, and the Haitian US Charismatic Renewal Click Here to learn more

December 10, 2017 – US Oblates and the 50th Anniversary of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, Part 3: Hispanic Charismatic Renewal Click Here to learn more

November 15, 2017 – US Oblates and 50th Anniversary of the Charismatic Renewal, Part Two Click Here to learn more

September 13, 2017 – US Oblates and the 50th Anniversary of the Charismatic Renewal, Part One Click Here to learn more


Controversial Article

An important Italian Catholic journal, La Civilta Cattolic, has an English version, and in the July 21 issue, there was a controversial article linking Protestant Fundamentalism with Catholic Integralism in the USA. An American bishop has responded with an easily readable article, agreeing with some of the author’s insights, by disagreeing with others. Click Here to learn more


Presbyterians join Lutherans and Roman Catholics (2017)

Five hundred years after the Reformation, one of Protestantism’s leading branches has officially said it now agrees with the Vatican on the main issue at the root of its split from the Roman Catholic Church. Click Here to learn more


Luther, Literacy, and Martin Luther King (2017)

(The Conversation) This year marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s famous 95 theses, which helped spark the founding of the Reformation and the division of Christianity into Protestantism and Catholicism. The Conversation Click Here to learn more


Four Oblates Praised; Vital Statement Examined at Ecumenical Meeting (2017)

During the National Workshop on Christian Unity, held May 1-4 in Minneapolis, MN, four Oblates were praised and a vital statement concerning Social Justice, Mission, and Ecumenism/Interreligious Dialogue was publicized. Click Here to learn more


Commentary on the Statement “Christian Witness in a Multi-Religious World” (2017)

As an ecumenist convinced that Mission is at the heart of Christian Unity, I was stunned at the May 1-4, 2017 National Workshop on Christian Unity (NWCU)to discover that the statement “Christian Witness in a Multi-Religious World” was published in November, 2011. I had never heard of this remarkable, vital and practical accomplishment of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, the World Council of Churches, and the World Evangelical Alliance. Click here to learn more


The 500th Anniversary on the Reformation: A Year of Unparalleled Opportunity (2017)

In his new book on Martin Luther: An Ecumenical Perspective, Cardinal Walter Kasper notes that our ideas about Martin Luther have undergone transformations in a number of ways over the past 500 years. Historically, for Catholics, Luther was the church father of Protestantism, the heretic to blame for the division of the Western Church. Click Here to learn more


Islam and Oblates

The 2017 De Mazenod Conference of the Missionary Oblate Partnership was held February 10-12 at the Oblate Renewal Center in San Antonio, Texas. The theme of this year’s conference: Christianity & Islam: Can We Talk? provided opportunities for enlightened conversations on a highly-charged and often emotional topic.  Click Here to learn more

Basics of Islam

The Basics of Islam, presented to Oblate Partners, Feb. 10-12, San Antionio, TX.  Scott Woodward, DMin, Oblate School of Theology
Click Here to learn more


Archbishop Hebda encourages homework in uniting Catholics and Lutherans (2017)

Most Rev. Bernard Hebda, Roman Catholic archbishop of St. Paul/Minneapolis, delivered these remarks at the joint serve led by two Lutheran bishops at Central Lutheran Church, Minneapolis, MN on Jan. 22, 2017. His remarks set the spirit, though, for the entire year to come when on Jan. 21, 2018, one of the Lutheran bishops will speak at Hebda’s cathedral. Read of his inspiring and joyful presentation. Click Here to learn more


Oblate School of Theology Reformation Achievement: (2017)

Rev. Paul Ziese, Pastor of San Antonio, Tx’s MacArthur Lutheran Church: “There is probably more openness among Catholics to the need for reformation, and more Protestants recognize the wound of the Reformation.” Click Here to learn more


Witnessing to Jesus, and Ecumenism at Royal Wedding of May 19, 2018

African-American Episcopalian Bishop Michael Curry’s sermon at the royal wedding is a marvelous combination of witnessing to Jesus, and Christian Unity. His quoting Jesuit theologian Teilhard de Chardin is unprecedented in such a world-wide event.  Click Here to learn more


Jim Holland, Praised Indigenous Oblate Missionary, to dismissed oblate, to Honary Oblate? 

When our superior general, Louie Lougen, wrote his article for the Catholic Digest on Oblate Spirituality, he mentioned how Oblates are not only specialists in difficult missions, but specialists in making missions difficult (see Dialogue/Islam Page for his article).  Click Here to learn more


For Lucien Bouchard OMI’s Ministry to Hmong in Laos

Im writing these notes about my missionary life in Southeast Asia and will relate especially about my 18 ½ years stay in Laos from Nov. 17, 1956 to May 8, 1975. After I was forced out of Laos by the Communist Lao regime in 1975, I then joined six French ex-Laos missionaries and went with them to Indonesia where we arrived at the end of January, 1977 in the city of Jakarta.  Click Here to learn more


Fr. Greg Gallagher, OMI Re-Elected Presiddent of U.S. Catholic Mission Association  (May 2016)

Fr. Greg Gallagher, OM, Administrative Councilor/ Office of Mission and Ministry/Assistant Treasurer for the U.S. Province has been I re-elected president of the U.S. Catholic Mission Association.  Click Here to learn more


Fr. Gallaher’s role in the choosing the new Executive Director of the US Catholic mission Association.

The Board of Directors of the United States Catholic Mission Association is pleased to announce the selection of Donald L. McCrabb, D.Min, as the new Executive Director for the USCMA, effective Dec. 7, 2015.  Click Here to learn more


The Manhattan Decoration, an Oblate Connection (2009)

For most Oblates of a certain age, “Manhattan” means either the island borough in N.Y. City, or the “project” which developed the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. But on Nov. 20, 2009, an ecumenical group released a statement pledging their commitment to defend human life, traditional marriage, and the rights of conscience.  Click Here to learn more


Buffalo New York, Holy Angels Church, 2 Bishops Statements

Personal Disclosure: the photo to the right shows Episcopalian then Father William Franklin with Father Harry Winter, O.M.I. and Father Franklin’s father-in-law, Joseph Vircillo, at the home of Joe and his wife Catarina Vircillo, in Fr. Winter’s Buffalo, NY parish, St. Rose of Lima, for the Christmas Eve traditional Italian fish dinner, 1998. Also at table but not in the photo is Father Franklin’s Catholic wife, Carmela Vircillo Franklin, a classical Latin scholar, who served as Director of the American Academy in Rome from 2005-10. During that time, Father Franklin served at several Episcopalian and Anglican Churches in Italy. They have two adult daughters.

Such marriages between leaders of two Christian Churches, once very rare, are becoming increasingly frequent. Are we Oblates prepared to work with such leaders?


Catholic and Episcopal Bishops of Western New York Issue Joint Call for Shared Prosperity   March 4, 2016 2:57 pm

The Right Rev. R. William Franklin, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western New York, and Most Reverend Richard Joseph Malone, Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo issued am inspiring joint pastoral letter late last year, which we would like to share more widely. Our thanks go out to Fr. Harry Winter, OMI for bringing.  Click Here to learn more 


Priestless County Adapts (1977)

How does a former Oblate parish covering an entire county, adapt to being priestless? Several very significant elements have developed in Monroe County, West Virginia, to help the faith grow. Jim  MacGee OMI became the first resident priest in Monroe County, in 1977.
Click Here to learn more


Newman DeMazenod, Bede

In the last issue of VieOblateLife (68,#1),, Bishop Gilles Cazabon OMI explained that St. Eugene visited Blessed Newman in 1859, at Maryvale, England (p. 41). As in many things, St. Eugene was ahead of his time, recognizing Newman’s holiness and insights. Do we need to continue our ecumenical conversion as a congregation?  Click Here to learn more


November 22, 2013:  Ecumenical and Missionary Aspects of the Assassination of John F. Kennedy. 

From 1941 to 2006, Oblates ministered in Appalachia, especially in West Virginia. At that time, the Catholic population of the state was less than 5%; Protestants made up about 45% and were considered very anti-Catholic. John F. Kennedy could only win the presidency of the USA if he won his party’s primary election in WV.    Click Here to learn more


The following statement, Please click here, is not only a celebration of Maryknoll’s Centennial, but more importantly for Oblates, how to refocus with diminishing numbers. Please consider especially the fourth principal, Mission and the Mass