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Eucharistic Hospitality

Two Authorities Lessen the Rigidity Against Eucharistic Hospitality

 Father Thomas Rausch, SJ, recently observed that under Pope Benedict, the first principle of the Eucharist as a sign of unity "almost completely eclipsed the second," the Eucharist as a means of grace. "While intercommunion depends on formal relationships between churches, Eucharistic hospitality is personal, occasionally welcoming those non-Catholic Christians who share a Eucharistic faith and want to live in communion with us" (Ecumenical Trends 46 [April, 2017,4] 10/58.

The cardinal in charge of interpreting authoritative statements, Francesco Coccopalmerio, wrote that the competent authority for deciding if Catholics in irregular marital situations can receive Communion, is the parish priest, consulting if necessary with the bishop (Gerard O'Connell, " 'Amoris' opens the door to Communion for Catholics in irregular unions," America, March 20, 2017, p. 17).  Until now, most believed it had to be the bishop who made such decisions.

For the story and photo of Rev. Martin Reardon (Anglican) and Dr. Ruth Reardon (RC) and their influence in this matter, see the click on within the January, 2016 Eucharistic sharing article on the home page.

Archbishop Hebda and Eucharistic Hospitality

 

During his presentation of Jan. 22, 2017, at Central Lutheran Church, Minneapolis, MN, (described on our home page), Archbishop Hebda explainedhow he had visited the exposition on Luther and the Arts, at the Minneapolis Institute of Art on Jan. 2.  He related that his docent was a Lutheran woman married to a Roman Catholic, who told him how difficult it was for her to be denied Communion when she attended Mass with her husband.  Hebda said very clearly "We have to work on this."

Update, October 1st. 2015.  Ron Rolhieser, OMI, Column for April 26th 2015 : Praying for Other Christians
Please click here

Convergence of Protestant Sunday Worship with Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Worship

For Eucharistic Ministers, and All Christians Concerned about Sharing in the Lord’s Supper/Eucharist

On July 20, 1969, a Presbyterian elder, Buzz Aldrin, celebrated the first Communion service on the moon. It was actually the first liquid poured and food eaten on the moon.  Many Christians found this surprising; Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox have a Sunday Eucharist, but what were Presbyterians doing carrying the consecrated species to the moon?

The amazing truth is that all Christian Churches have been converging regarding the importance of the Sunday Lord’s Supper, and its twofold form of the Table of the Word and the Table of the Sacrament. This fact should influence the hospitality which especially Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox show to members of other Churches when they participate in the Lord’s Supper.

For Roman Catholics, the blunt reality was stated in the Decree on Ecumenism, #8:  the fact that common worship should signify the unity of the Church generally rules out common worship; the gaining of a needed grace sometimes commends it. Note the word is “commends,” not “tolerate,” or “allow.” 

Since these two almost contradictory principles were first stated in 1964, the convergence of practice and belief regarding the Lord’s Supper has been remarkable.  Cardinal Ratzinger, at the funeral of Pope John Paul, extended the Eucharist to the Protestant members of the Taize Community.  John Paul II had done the same thing with Taize members earlier.

For a complete treatment, please click here for Ecumenical Trends, Sept. 2013, p. 14/126.

The article below, even though published in 1970, is unfortunately more relevant than ever.

 

THE EUCHARIST: Ecumenical Preaching

To view this publication, please click here

 

PREACHING ECUMENICALLY ON THE EUCHARIST

To view this publication, please click here

April 28th, 2017

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